Then and Now’s of Voice + Wavelink on the Road!

Hello everyone!

We are on the road this week at Oracle Openworld, and we are using the show as an opportunity to promote our newest video, which is a look at the history of voice-enabled applications. Take a look at the way voice driven data collection has evolved over the years.

Gemma Randazzo was kind enough to send along a greeting from Sam, Don, and Mikkel who are at Openworld:

 

Defining the Mobile Ecosystem – Our New Facebook App

Good afternoon! We’re excited to share our new Facebook App that helps customers and partners understand the mobile ecosystem, and how Wavelink solutions fit into each piece.

We invite you to check it out today!

Translating Wavelink’s Reporting Features For BI / Analytics

As everyone is aware by now, Big Data and BI / Analytics continues to be a significant part of Gartner’s top 10 priorities for CIOs for 2012 (see, for example: http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1826214).  This makes it one of the top 10 priorities for supply chain managers as well.   What many supply chain organizations and their supporting partners may not be aware of, is that they have some unique data that can be added to the BI / Analytics toolkit via their already deployed Wavelink device management and device client applications.   All that is needed is a little effort to map the Wavelink reported statistics onto the enterprise’s other BI / Analytic framework.

Wavelink Avalanche provides a wealth of device management reporting to supply chain management operations.  Not only does it supply pre-configured, off-the-shelf reports, but the system is flexible enough to support creation of custom reports by the end-user or by a certified Wavelink partner.   Data provided in these reports would fall under the category of “Dashboarding”, “Advanced Analytics with Drill-down”, and/or, “Scorecarding and KPIs”, using the current vernacular of BI / Analytics (see, “Driving SMB Efficiency With Business Intelligence,” for example).   However, unlike those more general reports, Wavelink provided data adds an additional dimension to the reporting by focusing specifically on the mobile device assets used in real-time supply chain operations.   For customers using Wavelink’s Emulation Clients, (Telnet, or WIB), there are even more real-time statistics available for reporting, and would make an excellent input to “Exception Handling and Alerting”, functions of BI / Analytics applications.

So, how do supply chain managers take advantage of these features to support their CIO’s BI / Analytics functions?

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Who Owns Mobile?

The National Retail Federation (NRF) recently penned the question “Who owns mobile in your company? Does it reside with your e-commerce team? Does it fall within marketing? Perhaps IT? Or is it a team made up of representatives from across the organization?” As Vicki Cantrell states it is a “mobile conundrum” and its impacting your brand.

At LANDesk and Wavelink, we spend a lot of time discussing this mobile conundrum and where the responsibility for it falls. The reality is today it isn’t just a one department answer. Today’s instant gratification, super cool technology is evolving quicker than a business knows what to do with it. They just know they have to keep up, and it’s no clearer than where the average consumer spends the majority of their time – the retail space. Retail defines cool, and it’s where slick marketing and graphics can create such buzz that every high school kid wants to dress like an Abercrombie model. On the flip side, it’s also where negative buzz and press can create a backlash so that those same kids then decide they don’t want to wear Abercrombie because the Situation said so. You have to stay on-trend, or run the risk of hurting your brand.

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Wavelink at ScanSource’s Next is Now

Kelly Ungs, Senior Director of Channels, is back on the road in South Carolina at ScanSource’s Next is Now Partner Conference.

Four Voice Picking Solutions….. Not Just Three….

I was just re-reading Maida Napolitano’s article on Voice Picking from Logistics Management magazine mid-2010 (“Three Voices, Three Solutions”, Maida Napolitano, Logistics Management, July 2010). In it, Ms. Napolitano highlights three different voice picking solutions, from three different providers. All three solutions have different architectures. This provides the foundation for the segmentation of the voice solutions in the article.

Although the article is an excellent overview of three of the possible architectures for voice solutions, there is one small problem. There are actually FOUR different architectures available today, providing (at least), four different voice platforms.

Napolitano’s article covers the following designs:

  • Proprietary Solutions – These are speaker-dependent solutions requiring custom voice hardware, and are the oldest voice solutions on the market.
  • Open Hardware – These can be speaker-dependent, or -independent, and utilize off-the-shelf mobile device hardware with thick-client applications provided by the voice solution provider.
  • Intelligent Networks – These are speaker-dependent, or -independent, and utilize a thin-client “approach”, with “more intelligence placed in the network” (Quotations mine).

Although this description gets very close to enumerating all the differences in voice architectures, it is missing one key design.  Also, it tends to separate  two solutions that share a fundamental design element, and lumps in the missing element as part of the last one.

Let me explain.

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“Medical Mobility: Benefit or Burden?” – A Guest Post

Medical-Mobility_infographic

Today’s post comes from our friends at LANDesk. I wanted to point you to their blog and some of the topics they cover on a regular basis, which are well-worth the read. The post I’m sharing today discusses the benefits and/or burdens of mobility in the healthcare mobile ecosystem. You can read the full post in the link above, and check out the cool infographic below!

Looking to Talk Mobility, but not Sales Pitches?

As I mentioned in “Cutting to the Chase: Let’s Talk MDM“, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to find thoughtful, insightful discussions on mobile device management, enterprise mobility, etc. With a few exceptions, such as The Enterprise Mobility Forum, and a few LinkedIn groups, it’s hard to find discussions that aren’t bogged down by this individual pitching that solution, and so on. 

We want to change that. I invite you to check out our LinkedIn Group where we want to create a community of enterprise mobility professionals connecting, and talking all things “mobile ecosystem”. We filter who can and cannot join, ensuring that anyone who is simply there to promote their solution will either be rejected, or removed. The hope is that you can talk shop, ask questions, and/or learn new technologies without spending an afternoon weeding through spam.

Take a look. Don Osburn posted a follow-up to his post on Tuesday, that I think you’ll find interesting. Feel free to submit your own discussions, polls, questions, etc., and rememeber to pass it along to anyone else you think would be interested.

Have a great Labor Day weekend!

The Risk Of Increasing Operational Cost (OPEX) By Doing MDM Backwards

We’re all aware of the explosion of new devices arriving in the marketplace.   From phones, to tablets, to bigger phones, to smaller tablets,…. And all of the new challenges and opportunities these devices bring with them.  Everyone is abuzz with the new terms of “device consumerization”, and “application containerization”, etc.,. etc.  The emergence of so many new devices, with so many different form factors is exploding the options for endpoint connectivity into enterprise business applications.  

However, what do all these new devices really mean in terms of providing enhanced value to today’s business processes?   And, what do these changes really imply in terms of mobility device management?   Is it possible, as is often the case with rapidly evolving technologies, that all the hype is really about a rather thin area of deployment, and is overlooking some, or possibly many, of the basic fundamentals?   If so, what does this imply about future costs?

Three prior articles shed some light on these questions.   Consider the following highlights.

  • According to Aberdeen Group’s Analyst Insight, “High Performance Organizations Empower Employees with Real-Time Mobile Analytics”, July, 2011
    • The adopters for Mobility Business Intelligence (MBI) on emerging mobile devices can be segmented as follows;
      • Enterprise Executives – The Board Room and other C-Level company stakeholders
        • These users are interested primarily in Dashboards that allow them to view the holistic health of the business from one central platform.
      • Field Sales – The road warriors and those dependent upon direct interface with the company’s customers
        • These users are primarily interested in real-time data to help close sales faster, (i.e. inventory stock data), as well as increase customer satisfaction, (i.e. trouble ticket response data).
      • Operations – Operations management including I/T
        • These users want to deploy Dashboards again, but focused solely on the health of their specific area of operation, (i.e. server uptime, etc). (more…)

An Ocean Away – Does Mobility Look Different Down Under?

The following comes from Simon Storey, our Australian Sales Manager:

Hello everyone! My name is Simon Storey and I’m the Sales Manager for Australia and New Zealand. I’ve been in the industry for 15 years, and over that time I’ve seen the industry from a variety of geographical locations, including EMEA, North America, and now, ANZ.

So, how does the mobile ecosystem look from down under? Well, the truth is, mobility is mobility, whatever corner of the globe you’re looking at it from. My customers and partners in Australia and New Zealand look at mobile device management needs the same way our friends back in the states do, and I think it’s safe to say that customers are much more informed about the space than they ever have been. As such, they are looking for solutions that will transform roles and have tremendous operational impact.

For instance here are just 3 examples of roles that would value taking the technical data collected and convert this into management information

  • COO’s – provide utilization and operational availability of the investment in mission critical devices
  • CFO’s – provide pro-active spend mapping for consumable and device refreshes including tangible ROI analyses for mobility projects
  • CTO’s – provide pro-active estate management with trending of issues and replacement requirements including utilizing the information to run technical trials and let the system tell them which device operates best in their environment

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