Wavelink Blog

Tag: wifi

Broadband Devices Driving Mobile Market Gains

I actually just saw this headline this morning in another popular blog spot and the timing seemed appropriate. We are seeing a huge upswing in the need for organizations to track, monitor and manage personal and business-class devices. Unlike traditional AIDC devices, most business class devices are designed for Broadband first and Wi-Fi second, putting a lot more data on the cellular carrier networks.

I find it interesting that the article talks in terms of market saturation, but what I am also hearing here is the potential for network saturation. One of the things that Wavelink Engineering has spent significant time on is making sure that a multi-modal Mobile Device will choose the best medium for updates, and restricting large updates to only those connections that meet a configurable minimum adapter link speed.

The article also talks about the efficiency and cost-effective nature of text messaging. We thought about that too. We can reach out to a multi-modal device first using SMS messaging to ask it to perform an update without knowing whether Wi-Fi or Broadband is available. When the device receives the message requesting an update, it can automatically choose the best network to perform that update.

Anyway, I’m watching the growth of iPhone, Android and Blackberry closely, and I’ll be curious to see how it plays itself out in the AIDC market.

Explosive Results; TNT and Wavelink

Some of you may have seen this article yesterday about  TNT Express who was featured in Computing (a UK-based magazine) for its use of Avalanche. The extensive article covers the need for device management and specifically highlights the way Avalanche is being used at TNT. TNT and more specifically David Thornhill,  was approached to appear in the article based on the recently released Wavelink press release that detailed the TNT roll-out.

We’re glad to see TNT being recognized for their success!

Wi-Fi – Ruggedized versus Consumer Grade – Part II

Yesterday we talked about some of the basic differences between a consumer grade Wi-Fi device and one made for the AIDC industry (the ruggedized version).  Now let’s dig into some more detail.

Vendors of AIDC equipment know that having an industrial grade supplicant is key.  So the supplicants they pre-load are built to deal with harsh Wi-Fi environments and the extremes of competing with large numbers of other third party networks.

Supplicants supplied by all the major AIDC vendors handle the example cited in yesterday’s blog posting about our Seattle office with ease.  And these supplicants go further…


Wi-Fi – Ruggedized versus consumer grade. What are the differences?

As many of you have come to find out through the use of smartphones and PDAs with Wi-Fi, that getting connectivity can often be a headache.  Although 3G has reduced these woes through better coverage, the truth is that some devices just don’t want to connect to Wi-Fi when you haven’t got the luxury of 3G.

The symptoms are typically that your device connects and then drops the connection and then hunts for another.  And sometimes the connection looks promising – you have three or four bars and yet the device comes back and says “unable to connect”.  You shrug your shoulders, you move on and it was no big deal.

However, if this was your network and the device has to work, you’d be frustrated.  Now, in AIDC, this is precisely the case as it’s a critical business productivity tool on which you depend.  To help with this, these devices typically have a more industrial grade radio in them – it might be more sensitive or have greater power.  However, the design improvements don’t stop there.  (more…)